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Ashley Jian awarded Marian Sarah Parker Prize from the College of Engineering

Jian’s research is focused on improving the efficiency of high-power electronics, which is important for energy security and sustainability.
Ashley Jian

PhD student Ashley Jian has been awarded the Marian Sarah Parker Prize from the College of Engineering in recognition of her academic excellence, leadership qualities, and outstanding contributions to the university and community.

Jian’s research is focused on improving the efficiency of high-power electronics, which enable everything from data servers to high-speed trains. This work is essential for “energy security,” meaning the availability of energy sources at an affordable price to sustain modern economies and life.

“Energy security is one of the biggest concerns in our century,” Jian said. “I want to help develop high-efficiency power devices to solve this kind of problem.”

Jian plans to further her research on wide bandgap-based power devices with high-efficiency performance by developing smaller and lighter modules with lower and greener power dissipation. Her goal is help revolutionize the power electronics industry for a more sustainable, secure future.

“Power electronics are used everywhere,” Jian said. “If we can improve their energy efficiency, that will benefit our Earth very much.”

In the past four years, Jian has published her results in ten journal papers(seven of which featured her as first author) and six conference presentations. She was also given a Best Presentation award at the 63rd Electronic Materials Conference. She works as a Senior User and in the U-M Lurie Nanofabrication Facility (LNF) and is a member of the LNF User Committee.

In addition to her research, Jian is an active member of the university and engineering community. She participated in C-PHOM high school research program, and she’s mentored several undergraduate students. She serves as an Engineering Teaching Consultant at the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching (CRLT), where she shares teaching strategies, including inclusive and active learning, with GSIs/IAs in one-on-one consultations.

Jian received her B.S. in Electrical Engineering at the Beihang University, China, and M.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Michigan. She is advised by Prof. Elaheh Ahmadi.

Explore:
Elaheh Ahmadi; Electronics, Devices, Computers; Graduate students; Honors and Awards; Lurie Nanofabrication Facility; Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology; Student News; Sustainability